ls.abravanelhall.net
New recipes

A New Type of Chocolate Has Been Invented: Blond Chocolate

A New Type of Chocolate Has Been Invented: Blond Chocolate


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Valrhona, the French chocolate manufacturer, is bringing an entirely new type of chocolate to New York

We already salivate around dark, milk, and white… and now we have a fourth type of chocolate to go gaga for?

Talk about blond ambition. Valrhona Chocolate, the 90-year-old luxury French chocolate producer and one of the leaders of the fair trade “bean to bar” movement, is launching its first-ever U.S. Besides releasing high-quality versions of chocolate forms we’re already familiar with, Valrhona will also debut an entirely new type of chocolate. That’s right. You thought there was only milk, dark, and white chocolate, but Valrhona has introduced us to caramel-colored blond chocolate.

The founding director of Valrhona’s L’École du Grand Chocolat (a pastry and chocolate craft school), Frédéric Bau, who developed the new variety in secret for eight years, calls the first blond variety “Dulcey” and describes it as having “a delicately sweet taste, intense biscuit flavors with a pinch of salt, a creamy texture, hints of caramelized milk, and unique blond color.” Blond chocolate is roughly a light caramel hue and is “creamy and toasty” in texture.

“With the opening of L’École du Grand Chocolat Brooklyn in DUMBO Valrhona brings its spirit of developing creativity and camaraderie among culinary professionals to its America for the first time,” Valrhona representatives said. The chocolate shop will also offer candy- and pastry-making classes for amateur gourmands.


Different Types Of Chocolate

“Unsweetened chocolate”, also known as “bitter”, “baking chocolate”, or “cooking chocolate”, is pure chocolate liquor mixed with some form of fat to produce a solid substance. The pure, ground, roasted cocoa beans impart a strong, deep chocolate flavor. With the addition of sugar, however, it is used as the base for cakes, brownies, confections, and cookies.

“Dark chocolate”, also called “black chocolate”, is produced by adding fat and sugar to cocoa. It is chocolate with no milk or much less than milk chocolate. The U.S. has no official definition for dark chocolate. Dark chocolate can be eaten as is, or used in cooking, for which thicker, baking bars, usually with high cocoa percentages ranging from 70% to 99% are sold. Dark is synonymous with semisweet, and extra dark with bittersweet, although the ratio of cocoa butter to solids may vary.
“Semisweet chocolate” is frequently used for cooking purposes. It is a dark chocolate with (by definition in Swiss usage) half as much sugar as cocoa, beyond which it is “sweet chocolate.”

“Bittersweet chocolate” is chocolate liquor (or unsweetened chocolate) to which some sugar (less than a third), more cocoa butter, vanilla, and sometimes lecithin has been added. It has less sugar and more liquor than semisweet chocolate, but the two are interchangeable when baking. Bittersweet and semisweet chocolates are sometimes referred to as ‘couverture’. Many brands now print on the package the percentage of cocoa in the chocolate (as chocolate liquor and added cocoa butter). The higher the percentage of cocoa, the less sweet the chocolate is.

“Couverture” is a term used for chocolates rich in cocoa butter. Popular brands of couverture used by professional pastry chefs and often sold in gourmet and specialty food stores include: Valrhona, Felchlin, Lindt & Sprüngli, Scharffen Berger, Cacao Barry, Callebaut, Chocodate, Chocofig fuel chocolates, and Guittard. These chocolates contain a high percentage of cocoa.

“Milk chocolate” is solid chocolate made with milk in the form of milk powder, liquid milk, or condensed milk added. In the 1870s, Swiss confectioner Daniel Peter developed solid milk chocolate using condensed milk, but German company Jordan & Timaeus in Dresden, Saxony had already invented milk chocolate in 1839 hitherto it had only been available as a drink. The U.S. Government requires a 10% concentration of chocolate liquor. EU regulations specify a minimum of 25% cocoa solids. However, an agreement was reached in 2000 that allowed what by exception from these regulations is called “milk chocolate” in the UK, Ireland, and Malta, containing only 20% cocoa solids, to be traded as “family milk chocolate” elsewhere in the European Union.

“Hershey process” milk chocolate is popular in North America. It was invented by Milton S. Hershey, founder of The Hershey Company, and can be produced more cheaply than other processes since it is less sensitive to the freshness of the milk. The process is a trade secret, but experts speculate that the milk is partially lipolyzed, producing butyric acid, which stabilizes the milk from further fermentation. This compound gives the product a particular sour, “tangy” taste, to which the American public has become accustomed, to the point that other manufacturers now simply add butyric acid to their milk chocolates.

“White chocolate” is a confection based on sugar, milk, and cocoa butter without the cocoa solids.

“Cocoa powder” is used for baking, and for drinking with added milk and sugar. There are two types of unsweetened cocoa powder: natural cocoa (like the sort produced by the Broma process), and Dutch-process cocoa. Both are made by pulverising partially defatted chocolate liquor and removing nearly all the cocoa butter Dutch-process cocoa is additionally processed with alkali to neutralise its natural acidity. Natural cocoa is light in colour and somewhat acidic with a strong chocolate flavour. Natural cocoa is commonly used in recipes that also use baking soda as baking soda is an alkali, combining it with natural cocoa creates a leavening action that allows the batter to rise during baking. Dutch cocoa is slightly milder in taste, with a deeper and warmer colour than natural cocoa. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used for chocolate drinks such as hot chocolate due to its ease in blending with liquids. However, Dutch processing destroys most of the flavonoids present in cocoa. In 2005 Hershey discontinued their pure Dutch-process European Style cocoa and replaced it with Special Dark, a blend of natural and Dutch-process cocoa.

“Compound chocolate” is the technical term for a confection combining cocoa with vegetable fat, usually tropical fats and/or hydrogenated fats, as a replacement for cocoa butter. It is often used for candy bar coatings. In many countries it may not legally be called “chocolate”.

“Raw chocolate” is chocolate that has not been processed, heated, or mixed with other ingredients. It is sold in chocolate-growing countries, and to a much lesser extent in other countries, often promoted as healthy.

Flavors such as mint, vanilla, coffee, orange, or strawberry are sometimes added to chocolate in a creamy form or in very small pieces. Chocolate bars frequently contain added ingredients such as peanuts, nuts, fruit, caramel, and crisped rice. Pieces of chocolate, in various flavours, are sometimes added to cereals and ice cream.


What Are the Four Types of Chocolate?

Chocolate is a delicious treat that people enjoy throughout the world. The word chocolate doesn’t just encapsulate a single item, as there are many different types of chocolate products, all of which are significantly different. However, there are four main categories, so let’s take a look at the four types of chocolate.

Milk Chocolate

Milk Chocolate is the most widely distributed type of chocolate, and it describes a specific type with certain percentages. It starts with solid chocolate and then has milk added in liquid, powdered, or condensed form. The percentage of cocoa required varies by region, with the US requiring a concentration of only 10% cocoa, while the EU requires 25%. Milk Chocolate has a creamier, milder taste which is very popular in the United States. Many chocolate bars are made with a milk chocolate base.

Dark Chocolate

Dark chocolate is the closest form to pure cocoa. In many regions it is also known as plain chocolate because not as many additives are included. The fat content comes not from added milk but from cocoa butter, giving it a purer flavor that is closer in profile to the cocoa bean. In the US, there are two main forms of dark chocolate – semisweet and bittersweet. Semisweet chocolate has less sugar and a sweeter flavor, while bittersweet chocolate is more bitter. Both are often used for cooking but can be eaten as is, and both are required to contain at least 35% pure cocoa.

There is also couverture dark chocolate, which is used for many professional applications. Popular in Europe, couverture chocolate has a higher percentage of cocoa butter and is often used for dipping, molding, and coating.

White Chocolate

White Chocolate, like milk chocolate, contains a significant amount of milk and added sugar. The difference, however, is that there are no cocoa solids in white chocolate. The only cocoa product used is cocoa butter. This gives the chocolate its white color as there are no solids involved in the production process. White chocolate still must contain at least 20% cocoa butter to be considered a chocolate product. It has a sweeter, milder taste than milk and dark chocolate, and often uses extra ingredients such as vanilla for added flavor.

Ruby Chocolate

The newest addition to the chocolate family is that of Ruby Chocolate, released a few years ago in 2017 by Barry Callebaut. The company had been working on the new form of chocolate since 2004. It is made from a special bean known as the ruby cocoa bean, which is a rare variety of the standard cocoa bean. The manufacturing process gives the chocolate a pink hue, and the flavor is a combination of sweet and sour. Some people find that there is a hint of raspberry flavor, but raspberries are not required in production. While it still tastes like chocolate, it is markedly different from the other three types. Right now, this is the most difficult kind of chocolate to find as the method of production is still a trade secret. Do you think you can spot all the different types of chocolate?


Maps Types of chocolate

Different forms and flavors of chocolate are produced by varying the quantities of the different ingredients. Other flavours can be obtained by varying the time and temperature when roasting the beans.

  • Milk chocolate is solid chocolate made with milk added in the form of milk powder, liquid milk, or condensed milk. In 1875, Swiss confectioner Daniel Peter, in cooperation with his neighbour Henri Nestlé in Vevey, developed the first solid milk chocolate using condensed milk. The bar was named "Gala Peter", combining the Greek word for "milk" and his name. A German company Jordan & Timaeus in Dresden, Saxony had already invented milk chocolate in 1839 hitherto it had only been available as a drink. The US Government requires a 10% concentration of chocolate liquor. EU regulations specify a minimum of 25% cocoa solids. However, an agreement was reached in 2000 that allowed an exception from these regulations in the UK, Ireland, and Malta, where "milk chocolate" can contain only 20% cocoa solids. Such chocolate is labelled as "family milk chocolate" elsewhere in the European Union.
    • Cadbury is the leading brand of milk chocolate in the United Kingdom. First produced by George Cadbury Junior in 1905, Cadbury Dairy Milk was made with a higher proportion of milk than previous chocolate bars, and it became the company's best selling product by 1914. It is the best selling milk chocolate bar in the UK, followed by Galaxy.
    • "Hershey process" milk chocolate is the most popular in the US. The process was invented by Milton S. Hershey, founder of The Hershey Company. The process uses fresh milk from local farms. The logistics of purchasing and delivering fresh milk is difficult as, according to state regulations, fresh milk cannot be held for more than 72 hours after its reception. If not immediately processed into milk chocolate, the milk must be disposed of. The actual Hershey process is a trade secret, but experts speculate that the milk is partially lipolyzed, producing butyric acid, and then the milk is pasteurized and stabilized. This process gives the product a particular taste, to which the US public has shown to have an affinity, to the extent that some rival manufacturers now add butyric acid to their milk chocolates.
    • Dark chocolate, also known as "plain chocolate", is produced using higher percentages of cocoa with all fat content coming from cocoa butter instead of milk, but there are also dark milk chocolates and many degrees of hybrids. Dark chocolate can be eaten as is, or used in cooking, for which thicker baking bars, usually with high cocoa percentages ranging from 70% to 100%, are sold. Baking chocolates containing no added sugar may be labeled "unsweetened chocolate".
    • Semisweet and Bittersweet are terms for dark chocolate used in the United States used to indicate the amount of added sugar. Typically, bittersweet chocolate has less sugar and more chocolate liquor than semisweet chocolate, but the two are interchangeable when baking. Both must contain a minimum of 35% cocoa solids many brands now print on the package the percentage of cocoa in the chocolate.
    • Couverture chocolate is a high-quality class of dark chocolate, containing a high percentage of cocoa solids and cocoa butter, and precisely tempered. Couverture chocolate is used by professionals for dipping, coating, molding and garnishing ('couverture' means 'covering' in French). Popular brands of couverture chocolate used by pastry chefs include: Valrhona, Lindt & Sprüngli, Scharffen Berger, Callebaut, and Guittard.
    • White chocolate is made of sugar, milk, and cocoa butter, without the cocoa solids. It is pale ivory color, and lacks many if the compounds found in milk and dark chocolates. It remains solid at room temperature as that is below the melting point of cocoa butter.
    • Cocoa powder is used for baking, and for drinking with added milk and sugar. There are two types of unsweetened cocoa powder: natural cocoa (like the sort produced by the Broma process), and Dutch-process cocoa. Both are made by pulverizing partially defatted chocolate liquor and removing nearly all the cocoa butter Dutch-process cocoa is additionally processed with alkali to neutralize its natural acidity. Natural cocoa is light in colour and somewhat acidic with a strong chocolate flavor. Natural cocoa is commonly used in recipes that also use baking soda as baking soda is an alkali, combining it with natural cocoa creates a leavening action that allows the batter to rise during baking. Dutch cocoa is slightly milder in taste, with a deeper and warmer colour than natural cocoa. Dutch-process cocoa is frequently used for chocolate drinks such as hot chocolate due to its ease in blending with liquids. However, Dutch processing destroys most of the flavonoids present in cocoa. In 2005, Hershey discontinued their pure Dutch-process European Style cocoa and replaced it with Special Dark, a blend of natural and Dutch-process cocoa.
    • Raw chocolate is chocolate that has not been processed, heated, or mixed with other ingredients. It is sold in chocolate-growing countries, and to a much lesser extent in other countries, often promoted as healthy.
    • Compound chocolate is the name for a confection combining cocoa with other vegetable fat, usually tropical fats or hydrogenated fats, as a replacement for cocoa butter. It is often used for candy bar coatings. In many countries it may not legally be called "chocolate".
    • Modeling chocolate is a chocolate paste made by melting chocolate and combining it with corn syrup, glucose syrup, or golden syrup. It is primarily used by cakemakers and pâtisseries to add decoration to cakes and pastries.
    • Ruby chocolate is a new type of chocolate, created by Barry Callebaut. The variety was in development from 2004. The new chocolate type is made from the Ruby cocoa bean, resulting in a distinct red color and a different flavour, described as "sweet yet sour".

    Flavours such as mint, vanilla, coffee, orange, or strawberry are sometimes added to chocolate in a creamy form or in very small pieces. Chocolate bars frequently contain added ingredients such as peanuts, nuts, fruit, caramel, and crisped rice. Pieces of chocolate, in various flavours, are sometimes added to breakfast cereals and ice cream.

    By country/region

    United States

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the naming and ingredients of cocoa products:

    In March 2007, the Chocolate Manufacturers Association, whose members include Hershey's, Nestlé, and Archer Daniels Midland, began lobbying the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to change the legal definition of chocolate to allow the substitution of "safe and suitable vegetable fats and oils" (including partially hydrogenated vegetable oils) for cocoa butter in addition to using "any sweetening agent" (including artificial sweeteners) and milk substitutes. Currently, the FDA does not allow a product to be referred to as "chocolate" if the product contains any of these ingredients. To work around this restriction, products with cocoa substitutes are often branded or labeled as "chocolatey" or "made with chocolate".

    Canada

    The legislation for cocoa and chocolate products in Canada is found in Division 4 of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR), under the Food and Drugs Act (FDA). The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the FDR and FDA (as it relates to food).

    The use of cocoa butter substitutes in Canada is not permitted. Chocolate sold in Canada cannot contain vegetable fats or oils.

    The only sweetening agents permitted in chocolate in Canada are listed in Division 18 of the Food and Drug Regulations. Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame, sucralose, acesulfame potassium, and sugar alcohols (sorbitol, maltitol, etc.) are not permitted.

    Products manufactured or imported into Canada that contain non-permitted ingredients (vegetable fats or oils, artificial sweeteners) cannot legally be called "chocolate" when sold in Canada. A non-standardized name such as "candy" must be used.

    European Union

    Products labelled as "Family Milk Chocolate" elsewhere in the European Union are permitted to be labelled as simply "Milk Chocolate" in Malta, the U.K. and the Republic of Ireland.

    Japan

    In Japan, 'chocolate products' are classified on a complex scale (q.v. ja. #. ).

    Chocolate materials ( . , chokor?to kiji) :

    • Pure chocolate material ( . , jun-chokor?to kiji)
    • Pure milk chocolate material ( . , jun-miruku chokor?to kiji)
    • Chocolate material ( . , chokor?to kiji)
    • Milk chocolate material ( . , miruku chokor?to kiji)
    • Quasi chocolate material ( . , jun-chokor?to kiji) a
    • Quasi milk chocolate material ( . , jun-miruku chokor?to kiji)

    Chocolate products ( . , chokor?to seihin) :

    Products using milk chocolate or quasi milk chocolate as described above are handled in the same way as chocolate / quasi chocolate.

    • Chocolate ( . , chokor?to)
    • Chocolate sweet ( . , chokor?to kashi)
    • Quasi chocolate ( . , jun-chokor?to)
    • Quasi chocolate sweet ( . , jun-chokor?to kashi)

    What Is Milk Chocolate?

    White chocolate is cocoa butter plus milk powder and sugar. It’s different from milk chocolate in that it contains no cocoa solids, and up until 2002, it wasn't legally considered chocolate in the United States. White chocolate doesn’t contain any cacao solids, which are the part of the plant containing all the nutrients and antioxidants, so it often receives the complaint that it’s not “real chocolate.” But part of that issue is historical since there was no legal definition of white chocolate for decades, a variety of products (some with no cocoa ingredients whatsoever) were marketed under that moniker.

    Real cocoa butter contains a chocolaty aroma and a large proportion of healthy fats. Since it melts at body temperature, it’s valuable within the cosmetics industry. Low-quality cacao butter concentrated in the food industry, the chocolaty aroma removed to further distance it from milk and dark chocolates. It became easier to dilute with cheaper fats and excess sugar, making it seem less like chocolate and more like milky candy. Once white chocolate was legally defined by the FDA, the landscape of flavors offered in white chocolate began to shift towards more of the creamy, chocolaty bars on the market today


    They have a delicious section of chocolate in blocks.

    For tempering

    Couverture is the ideal option for tempering chocolate that looks shiny and snaps when broken. A quality Belgian Dark Semisweet will cost a little more than everyday chocolate at the supermarket but it will provide a better final product.

    For desserts

    To quickly melt chocolate that is smooth-flowing, your best bet is Wilton Chocolate Pro. It is perfect for cookies, desserts, dipped strawberries, and even chocolate fountains.

    Need a snack?

    For quality milk chocolate that everyone loves try Lindt Milk Chocolate. Smooth, creamy chocolate that’s delicious. Try caramel with sea salt or milk hazelnut for a break from plain chocolate.

    Did you know? Cocoa beans were even used as a currency by ancient civilizations. The Aztecs revered the cocoa bean and believed they’d find heaven through the cocoa tree.


    5) Cocoa Butter

    Cocoa butter is simply the pure fat removed from cocoa beans during their processing. Although it is possible to buy pure cocoa butter, it is most commonly used for making chocolate bars.

    However, cocoa butter is costly, and one of the most expensive isolated fats. For this reason, many chocolate products use cheaper alternate fats such as palm oil.

    The primary fatty acid in cocoa butter is stearic acid, which is a type of saturated fat.

    Interestingly, stearic acid does not have a significant influence on lipids/cholesterol. As a result, cocoa butter has a smaller impact on LDL cholesterol levels compared to other rich sources of saturated fat (8).

    However, it does tend to have slightly more of an effect than olive oil and other cooking oils because it also contains high amounts of palmitic acid (9, 10).


    The Shelf Life of Chocolate

    It's Q&A time. Here is another question from a subscriber:

    "Once chocolate has been melted, how long is it good for once it has been molded (again)?"

    Chocolate is a very versatile and tolerant product to work with, the nuances of tempering aside. Chocolate can be melted, tempered and molded, re-melted, re-tempered and re-molded, again and again.

    The shelf life of chocolate depends on whether it is milk or dark and whether or not it has inclusions like nuts, coconut, or dried fruit.

    Dark chocolate lasts the longest before oxidizing, or going rancid. Cocoa butter is a very stable fat and once chocolate is crystallized, or tempered, it can resist bloom - fat migration - fairly well.

    A good temper and a consistent environment during storage are two of the more important steps to making dark chocolate last a long time. Typically, the shelf life of dark chocolate is nine to twelve months (I have seen it last longer). In fact, age will actually enhance the flavor of chocolate, although it will be subtle.

    If some bloom is present on the surface of the chocolate, melt the chocolate, temper it and mold again and it will be fine. Bloom is that grayish or whitish coating that can form on the surface of chocolate. It does not destroy the flavor of the chocolate, but the appearance is not appealing.

    Milk chocolate has a shelf life range of six months to nine months. The main reason milk chocolate has a shorter timeline is that the milk fat (butter oil) part of the milk oxidizes or goes rancid faster than cocoa butter. The higher the milk content in chocolate, the shorter the life span.

    Adding nuts to chocolate will decrease the shelf life in terms of bloom and rancidity. Nut oils migrate quickly to the surface of the chocolate causing bloom, and the oils behave similarly to milk fat in that they oxidize faster.

    Bryn Kirk

    Bryn worked for nearly 10 years in a research and product development for Ambrosia Chocolate Company in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Now she develops all of the CUO lessons and coaches the members of the Primal Chocolate Club.

    7 thoughts on &ldquo The Shelf Life of Chocolate &rdquo

    I am an university students doing an assignment on distribution of a product to a country in Africa. I chose chocolates in Ethiopia, but I am unable to find information on the storage of of this type of product. I am not sure if you could help, but your help would be greatly appreciated. I would like to know what are the warehousing requirements for chocolate, and how big/small should shelves be? What determines the price of a chocolate? And how many minutes/hours can chocolate last inside of a truck (when it is being delivered) before melting?

    Thank you for your questions. I have so many questions of my own (for example: the temp/humidity of Ethiopia, the length of travel in a truck and the type of truck – is it refrigerated? – what is the product made of?) that would influence the answers but even with this information I would not know the detailed answers to these specific questions that you are probably looking for. I assume when you say “chocolates” you mean a couverture (coating) that is in a stable tempered state. If so, keep in mind that while chocolate in this condition is shelf stable for many months, the conditions of the surrounding environment needs to be controlled at all times. The melt point of cocoa butter is generally around 89-91 degrees F but can start melting at even lower temps, especially at the surface of the chocolate. The humidity should be low and ideally some air movement with fans to keep heat from away from it. Perhaps the International Cocoa Organization will be able to help you with more details. Here is their website: https://www.icco.org/. Good luck to you on your studies!

    Hello, I’m making 73% raw organic chocolates and I use cold pressed essential oils extracts in them, and some of them contains nuts too. What would be their shelf life?
    Thank you

    I ‘ve made a low carb chocolate for keto dieters containing coconut oil, bakers chocolate(for now I’m planning to switch to cacao butter and powder) and a monk fruit blend as a sugar replacement and lecithin emulsifier would any of this affect the shelf of the end product? Also any ideas on how to determine the actual carb count? I’m confused by the packaging label on the monk fruit because it says 4 grams of carbs per tsp but 0 glycemic index

    Dark Compound Chocolate is often used in further cooking or processing. What is the expected shelf life from your experience with this type of product?

    Can you tell me about the shelf life of white chocolate?

    FDA standards of identity say that white chocolate must contain cocoa
    butter. If the white chocolate in question is indeed made with cocoa
    butter, and the white chocolate has a slight yellow tinge to it (meaning
    the cocoa butter was not stipped of its natural color and Vitamin E
    properties), then the shelf life will probably be 3-4 months. If the white
    chocolate is made with cocoa butter but looks really white, then the shelf
    life is probably 1-2 months.

    If the white chocolate in question is really a white confectionery coating
    made with a vegetable oil other than cocoa butter, the shelf life will
    vary depending on the melt point and type of oil used. Most likely, the
    shelf life will be about 4 – 5 months, and possibly 6 months.


    What Is Chocolate, Anyway?

    The base of all processed chocolate is chocolate liquor (not to be confused with alcoholic liqueur)&mdasha dark paste produced from grinding the nibs extracted from dried, fermented, roasted cocoa beans. In its natural state, chocolate liquor is about 55 percent cocoa butter. The remaining 45 percent is the cocoa solids responsible for chocolate&rsquos flavor. The cocoa butter and cocoa solids in chocolate liquor may be separated and recombined in different ratios together, they make up the cacao percentage in processed chocolate.


    The different types of chocolate

    Who in this world does not like chocolate? It is tasty, sweet and it has become a major component of the many universally loved treats, these include brownies, chocolate chip cookie, and hot fudge. Thousands of companies have been able to enjoy the successes through the marketing and manufacturing of their various chocolate products.

    Over the years chocolate has become the key ingredient when it comes to baking the delicious goodies. As a result, the armature bakers will benefit from the different types of chocolate that are available. Most people are familiar with the different types of chocolate that are available, but many people are not aware of how chocolate is easily converted from a cocoa bean, into this familiar final product that we all enjoy.

    The different types of chocolate

    Dark chocolate
    The dark chocolate is commonly identified as such, as it carries far less milk than the other kinds of chocolate that are present. At times, the chocolate might contain no milk at all. Mixing sugar, fat and some cocoa solids make this type of chocolate. Chocolate that contains cocoa solid of about 35 percent or more is considered to be dark chocolate, but any percentage that is slightly higher than that is a completely different type of chocolate. Due to the absence of milk in the chocolate, it appears to look far browner than other types of chocolate. Dark chocolate is commonly used in cooking and baking because most o these recipes include an addition of sugar. Thus, the dark chocolate balances out the sweetness.

    You can get dark chocolate in a range of cocoa percentages, and it could be sold with cocoa solid percentage up until 90 percent. Dark chocolate is considered by many to be far less sweet than the other varieties you can find in the market this is including white and milk chocolate. If you get dark chocolate that has higher percentages of the cocoa solid, it will tend to taste a little bit bitterer, than those that would be having a lower percentage.

    Milk Chocolate
    Milk chocolate is the variety of chocolate that most people are familiar with. Milk chocolate has been found to be the most popular kind this is regarding commercial use. The chocolate is made by adding milk, most of the time milk powder is added to the traditional chocolate combination of the cocoa butter, cocoa solids, sugar and often some vanilla is added in. Before milk chocolate was made to its solid form, people were only able to consume it as a liquid beverage. But this changed as the use of milk powder and condensed milk was introduced. The condensed milk or milk powder is made by evaporating until only the substance of milk powder remains, which enabled the chocolatiers to make the famous milk chocolate bars. The milk powder is commonly used as it has a longer shelf life than the liquid counterpart does.

    White chocolate
    White chocolate is considered by most as a very sweet chocolate variety. What makes this type of chocolate unique is that it is not made using any cocoa solids. Thus, it is classified as a chocolate derivative rather than the common types of chocolate we consume. White chocolate is made of a mixture of milk, cocoa butter, and sugar. The white chocolate does not contain cocoa solids but contains milk, which helps in explaining why this type of chocolate tends to look yellow or ivory white rather than the brown color we are accustomed to in chocolates.

    An interesting fact about white chocolate is, it can stay solid at higher temperatures than dark or milk chocolate will, this is because of the melting point of its main ingredient, cocoa butter, is much higher. However, white chocolate lacks many of the antioxidants found in the traditional chocolate due to lack of cocoa solids in its ingredients.

    Unsweetened Chocolate
    Unsweetened chocolate is mostly used interchangeably with the baking chocolate. The Unsweetened chocolate has been produced with no additional sugar. Thus, this type of chocolate maintains more of the original flavor contained in cocoa. As a result, this type of chocolate is very rich and rather bitter. The main ingredients used in making this type of chocolate are fat and chocolate liquor. When sugar and milk product is added, it will turn it to be milk chocolate. Unsweetened chocolate is primarily used in baking, as the bitter flavor is balanced out with the large amount of sugar included in the recipe.

    Semisweet Chocolate
    Semisweet chocolate is another type of dark chocolate. For dark chocolate to be classified as semisweet chocolate, it should contain half as much sugar as it does the cocoa solids. Any chocolate with sugar to the solid cocoa ratio that is higher than this is classified as sweet chocolate. Correspondingly, the bittersweet chocolates should not contain sugar that is more than a third the amount of chocolate liquor found n the product. Just like the unsweetened chocolate, the bittersweet and semi-sweet chocolates are mostly used for cooking and baking purposes, and most of these chocolates are sold in large quantities than the other types of chocolate you can find in the market.

    Couverture Chocolate
    It is a relatively new term for chocolate, which is not known by many individuals. It is a type of chocolate that contains a higher percentage of cocoa butter. Thus, this type of chocolate is mostly popular around the gourmet pastry and chocolatiers chefs. Some of the semisweet and bittersweet chocolates you might find can qualify as a couverture chocolate.

    Compound chocolate
    The compound chocolate is simply made by combining cocoa solids with one of the many substitutes for cocoa butter. The substitutes include coconut oil, vegetable oil and other hydrogenated fats you can find. Many countries do not permit compound chocolate to be sold as a traditional chocolate. This type of chocolate is mostly used as a coating or a topping on other confectionery goods. Compound chocolate is much cheaper to purchase and produce, compared to the other types of chocolate available. The reason being, the substitution of fats and oils is less expensive than the process involved in adding cocoa butter.

    Now that you have been introduced to the different types of chocolate that are available in the market, you can now work them into your baking recipes more creatively. Whether you prefer the milk chocolate or the white chocolate, there are a number of recipes that have included the various kinds of chocolate present.



Comments:

  1. Clustfeinad

    It is a pity that I cannot speak now - there is no free time. But I will return - I will definitely write what I think on this issue.

  2. Tavis

    Yes it is logically correct

  3. Nardo

    Not a bad topic

  4. Meztigami

    I will know, many thanks for the help in this question.

  5. Kidal

    And, consequently, ..

  6. Jular

    I'm sorry, this doesn't suit me. Who else can suggest?

  7. Orval

    Of course you're right. There's something about that, and I think that's a great idea.



Write a message