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Mathematicians Are Working on the ‘Perfect’ Cup of Drip Coffee

Mathematicians Are Working on the ‘Perfect’ Cup of Drip Coffee


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Finding the right equation for the ‘perfect’ cup of drip coffee is no easy task

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed drinks in the world.

Everyone’s “perfect” cup of coffee looks a little different, but five mathematicians are working to better understand what influences the final product to make the “perfect” cup of drip coffee. Their study will be published this week in the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics.

Previous studies have involved the math behind coffee extraction, but there has been little done on the coffee extraction specifically from drip filter machines (hot water over ground coffee in a filter), BBC reported.

During the drip filter process, gravity pulls water through the filter, which extracts coffee solubles from the grains composed of more than 1,800 chemical components, according to the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics website.

"Our overall idea is to have a complete mathematical model of coffee brewing that you could use to design coffee machines, rather like we use a theory of fluid and solid mechanics to design racing cars," Dr. William T. Lee, one of the mathematicians involved in the study, told BBC.

Going in with the knowledge that grinding beans too finely could result in over-extracted and bitter coffee, the study looked into the effect of coffee grain size and the final coffee product. The study will be able to help coffee-drinkers think of the coffee extraction process by how much coffee they want coming out of the beans based on grain size. It could also be used to optimize coffee machines, from an industrial standpoint, for a certain size of grain.

"What our work has done is take that [observation] and made it quantitative," Lee said.

A potential next step involves changing the shape of the coffee bed while water flows through the filter.

"The shape of the coffee bed is deformed as you brew the coffee. When it goes in first, it's sitting flat at the bottom of the filter, but at the end of [brewing] it's coating the walls of the filter. This also seems to play a role in how the coffee tastes," Lee added.


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades


How to make coffee in a drip coffee maker

A classic coffee maker may not seem like the most exciting way to make coffee these days but, with just a few simple steps, you can turn that slightly bland cup of joe into a fantastically flavorful brew.

The drip coffee maker, aka a standard coffee pot, is what you'll find in most American households — at least it was for years, until the recent popularization of single-serve coffee makers, like Keurig and Nespresso.

Drip coffee makers are easy to clean and come in a variety of customizable options. Some coffee makers grind beans, some can be pre-programmed to start brewing coffee right when you wake up (it's basically an aromatic alarm clock) and others drip coffee into a carafe that will keep your special brew hot for hours.

The cons? When using this type of machine, you don’t have control over how long the coffee brews or the temperature of the water, so it’s important to control what you can, which means it all comes down to the type of coffee beans used, the grind of those beans and the coffee-to-water ratio.

Before you brew, it’s important to note that a cup of water is 8 ounces, however, a coffee pot cup is 5 ounces. So a 12-cup capacity coffee maker is actually 60-ounces of liquid, or roughly 7 cups of coffee. If you only want to make 10 cups of coffee, for example, then use about 50 ounces of water.

Before using a coffee maker for the first time, make sure to thoroughly clean it. Wash all removable parts (including the decanter, decanter lid and the filter basket) separately using a mild dish soap. Put all parts back onto the machine, then run a brew cycle using only water to thoroughly clean the entire brewing system. When the cycle is finished, discard the cleaning water and you're ready to brew coffee.

Related

Food Science says we've all been making coffee incorrectly for decades



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